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 Post subject: Re: The DSP Movie Logs
PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2011 11:12 pm 
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Red State (2011)
Uhhhh, it's pretty much bullshit. Adolescent dialogue, unfocused plot, irritatingly vague political rhetoric. Characters come and go without any real effect. The story can't decide who it wants to follow or what it really wants to say and the result is a film that has the appearance of being interesting but is completely lacking in real engagement.

The worst problems with this movie lie in Kevin Smith's direction; even putting aside the daft script problems, there is a technical craftsmanship on display which is alarmingly amateur coming from a filmmaker with 15-plus years of experience under his belt. Maybe Smith has been this way all along and he's simply been forgiven by his fans up until now, but then he's never been a horror maestro. Horror, as a rule, is far less forgiving of bad filmmakers than comedy. Atmosphere is important, building tension is important; with very few exceptions, it's the technical execution that makes or breaks the genre. What we get in Red State are a lot of lazily shot action sequences. A lot of outstandingly terrible cinematography. A lot - and I mean a lot - of poor editing choices. There is no tonal flow to this movie whatsoever. The storytelling voice jumps at the most inappropriate times imaginable.

But whatever of the little goodwill Kevin Smith could have built up in the first hour and fifteen minutes of the movie (mostly through the performances of Michael Parks and John Goodman, who to their credit stay as dependable as ever) is completely eradicated by the film's ending. The way Smith chooses to close the story is as juvenile as it is completely unforgivable. It leaves you with is this long, excruciating experience of a manchild slapping you in the face for an hour and a half going, "Look how mature I am! Look how topical this is!" without any sense of self-awareness or understanding.

I understand that Kevin Smith wants to branch out, but what I'm positing here is that Kevin Smith's branching out happens to be a terrible fucking idea because he sucks at everything. Go back to raunchy stoner comedies and pop culture jokes, leave the horror genre to the grown-ups.

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 Post subject: Re: The DSP Movie Logs
PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2011 6:46 pm 
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The Immortals (2011)
Just to be clear with where I stand on this, I actually enjoyed the hell out of both Tarsem Singh's prior films, The Cell and The Fall. I don't think this should be taken as considering them great films in themselves, because they're really not; in fact, strip away the stylish set dressings and eyegasmic photography and you're left with a pair of discount bin films. The films aren't bad minus the glam, mind you. They're fine. But they're wholesale enough that they're easily forgotten. A bit like drinking a soup base, maybe.

Look at these films as films and prepare to be underwhelmed, but here's the one thing that's different: Tarsem Singh's visual eye is amazing. Amazing in a way that the occurrence of Singh's visual art onscreen feels like an exotic event in film. Bear in mind, his last two movies looked like this and this. If you take the simpler approach to his films, looking at them less as narratives and more as moving art galleries, they can be great treats. I'm also grateful that he's minimal and efficient enough with his storytelling that they are actually allowed to work effectively this way, rather than collapsing under overbloated delusions of grandeur as so many others do.

So, when I say that the storyline in The Immortals isn't mind-blowing, that it's simply an excuse to move across setpieces and fight sequences, that's not necessarily a terrible thing. I don't think Tarsem Singh has an inner Bergman waiting to bust out a great masterpiece, and to his credit I think he realizes this himself. No, he just sticks to doing really cool shit and giving it to us in the easiest possible way to digest. To my mind, this is perfectly Okay.

The Immortals is really cool, by the way. There are a handful of easy investor comparisons to 300, but there's more than enough of an personal stamp on the aesthetics and, even in the case of overlaps, for my money there's nothing in Snyder's bag of tricks that Tarsem hasn't proven to be far more capable of. He even makes the slow/fast motion edit look as smooth and dynamic onscreen as you imagine Snyder always envisioned his own version to be. Expect a wide-spanning epic and I think there will be disappointment, but as a popcorn muncher it's a pretty fun way to waste a couple of hours.

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 Post subject: Re: The DSP Movie Logs
PostPosted: Sat Nov 26, 2011 1:20 pm 
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To be honest, I think this is one of those cases where I'm just far too married to the novel to ever fully appreciate the movie, but I would say that it translated well enough. I was kind of worried that the production would get stuck in nostalgia for Terry Gilliam's adaptation of Fear and Loathing and come out too "wacky", which is very much not the type of novel The Rum Diary is, but I think it took the right tone and the themes translated solidly. It has a lot of the same sensibilities as Bruce Robinson's Withnail & I, which is fine as that dark mannerism is a perfect match for the material. The acting is terrific, especially Giovanni Ribisi, and Thompson's voice remains intact.

I wouldn't argue that it's a perfect film, but it's satisfactory.

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 Post subject: Re: The DSP Movie Logs
PostPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2011 10:25 am 
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Beautiful Boy (2010)

There's a lot of potential in examining the lives of parents affected by school shootings - particularly when the parents in question are of the shooter himself. There are emotional avenues in Beautiful Boy that are just crying out to be explored, but unfortunately the director got so involved with capturing the most melodramatic moments that he wastes most of the film's real potential. The emotional tone of this film is so completely one-note with its shrieking grief that comes off almost as shallow as a summer blockbuster. Tragedy Porn, we could call it, the guilty pleasure you can put on in a dark room when you feel like having a good cry. Which isn't to say that there isn't a seeming attempt for dimension, because there certainly is, but I don't think the film ever quite achieves it.

The acting, at least, is really good, although I actually enjoyed the ancillary performances quite a lot more than the central ones; I found the supporting actors to be much more toned-down and realistic in comparison to the showy centerpieces. God bless Michael Sheen and Maria Bello, really, I generally think they're terrific, but their work here as the shellshocked father and mother duo was so weeping and tragic that it teetered over into Oscar bait territory.

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Roger Dodger (2002)

It's really amazing to me both that I have never heard of actor Campbell Scott and that he seems to have fallen into complete obscurity after this movie, because his nuanced performance as the titular Roger Swanson in Roger Dodger is so deliciously sleazy that it's downright addictive. The character you love to hate, or is it hate to love. I seriously could have watched another hour of this guy just bumming around Manhattan, talking bullshit, instructing high school boys on how to get to third base... to the film's credit, it fills out the story arc beautifully and ends before any self-indulgence can kick in (and the sense of place this film has is fantastic, by the way), but I'm just saying that more time with that asshole Roger wouldn't have killed me. The character is so distinct that I couldn't possibly picture another actor filling the role.

Say what you guys will about Jesse Eisenberg too, but he does play "awkward nephew" well. This particular role seemed to fit his sensibilities perfectly and I thought he was really charming.

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The Honeymoon Killers (1969)

I wanted to like this one more than I did. The camp is enjoyable, it's almost like the film John Waters might make if he attempted a serious drama. The actress playing Martha Beck stole the show as the fat, bitchy, overbearing murderess who rules over her man with an iron fist. The film also moves at a snail's pace though and I never really felt like it fully justified the central relationship fueling the story. Still, it has moments.

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"Just remember this: all agents defect and all resisters sell out. That's the sad truth, Bill... and a writer? A writer
lives the sad truth like anyone else. The only difference is he files a report on it." ~Naked Lunch


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 Post subject: Re: The DSP Movie Logs
PostPosted: Sun Dec 11, 2011 6:45 am 
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Pretty good couple of days.

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Cast a Deadly Spell (1991)

Los Angeles, 1948. Everybody used magic.

That text forward is the first thing to appear on screen after the opening credits. The second thing is a Haitian witch performing a spell in moonlight on a city rooftop. The third thing is Remo Williams playing a harboiled detective named Lovecraft hired to hunt down the Necronomicon.

So, yeah - suspension of disbelief way, way out the window with this one. I think you can already see what sort of obvious flaws would arise in a movie of this nature (an HBO movie, no less), but you almost have to forgive all just on how much fun it is to watch. Sure, it's basically Raymond Chandler's The Big Sleep fused with Lovecraftian mythos and an assorted line-up of movie monsters, but the snappy dialogue, the bossin' old school creature effects and, yes, Fred Ward go a long way into making this pretty damn watchable. The world the film exists in comes together so nice and so casual-like and the characters navigate it so believably that it's pretty easy to stride into. It's just so... so likable. Everything in this movie is way more awesome than it deserves to be.

Oh, and to answer your question: yes, it ends with Cthulhu.

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Brimstone & Treacle (1982)
I'm not a huge fan of Sting and I sort of wish he hadn't been in this movie, but Denholm Elliot makes up for it and how fantastic is this Dennis Potter screenplay? I feel like I probably need to watch this again to catch all of the little details, but in all it was a pretty fascinating, twisted thriller. The prayer scene was particularly chilly.

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Tomb of Ligeia (1964)
Roger Corman has a long reputation for making bad, cheesy movies (even as a fan of these, I'd say rightfully so) and Vincent Price has a long reputation for being a hammy actor (once again, as a fan, rightfully so), but somehow their collaborative efforts bore much more impressive fruits than often either could do alone. My favorite is their adaptation of Poe's Masque of the Red Death, but I definitely see the appeal in Tomb of Ligeia, both storywise and visually. There's a nice sense of eeriness and a lot of cool scenes to be found in here, especially as the film builds to the finale even if I'm not sure that the last few minutes really work.

Also Vincent Price dresses steampunk for some reason.

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Seconds (1966)
Oh, so this is why people keep letting John Frankenheimer make movies.

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"Just remember this: all agents defect and all resisters sell out. That's the sad truth, Bill... and a writer? A writer
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 Post subject: Re: The DSP Movie Logs
PostPosted: Fri Dec 16, 2011 5:56 am 
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Apartment Zero (1988)

I've always liked Colin Firth... well, admired him, really. He's one of those rare actors who can play low-key and subtle in a way that is both completely believable and commanding enough to carry an entire film on his back without breaking a sweat. Problem being that, he doesn't usually work on the sort of films that interest me; if he's not in a stuffed-shirt BBC piece or a cheesy blockbuster (Momma Mia???), he's working in awards bait horseshit like The King's Speech (to be fair on this last one, I did think A Single Man was decent in an "I'm probably never gonna bother watching this again" sort of way).

But Apartment Zero is a pretty awesome, I must say. The best part being that it's an exact 180 from Firth's usual material. I was even more impressed in his performance here than in his more recent, more attention-grabbing work; turns out that playing a bound-up, sexually repressed, paranoid recluse with unhealthy emotional attachments (and while looking, it must be said, slightly Eraserhead-ish) is the perfect role for Firth's style and talent. It's a very skilled performance with a lot boiling just beneath the surface, and he even manages to come off creepier than the serial killer he's rooming with... oh, did I fail to mention that part earlier? Silly me. The pair are kind of a cute couple, as a matter of fact.

Actually, here's a good one-line pitch: Apartment Zero is a homoerotic update of The Odd Couple recast with mental patients. Firth is Felix and Patrick Bateman is Oscar. There's your movie, put it on the poster.

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Europa Europa (1990)

Yeah... I thought this was going to be Lars Von Trier's Europa, that other WWII movie that came out in 1991. So, just for sake of sense and convenience, can nineties-era European directors avoid naming any more WWII movies any multiples of the word "Europa" in the foreseeable future?

That being said, while not being what I expected, I thought that Europa, Europa was a solid film. It took a much different approach than your average Holocaust movie, because while the situation was appropriately dreary and bleak, the story, told in first person, also took on the strange quality of a fairy tale. The gorgeous photography had a candy-coloring as our hero, a Jewish teenager who has been uprooted through an accidental series of events, travels from country to country in a basic quest of survival. He moves into different sides of the war, encounters a series of people both good and bad and is often rescued from hopeless situations by miraculous, unforeseeable events. It's almost by force of magic that the young Salomon finds himself propelled from being a Jew to a Pole to studying communism under Stalin's Russia before finally faking his way into the Nazi ranks.

If I have one complaint, it's that the film a bit on the shallow side. The director makes it clear from the beginning, then throughout the piece as well, that he wants to make this movie a character study on survival, specifically about the inner conflict that comes from having to pretend to be something you're not, but then never actually delved into the problem all that much. Instead we get a more physical, extroverted version of this with most of the focus going into Salomon's circumcised penis and whether somebody will catch him in the shower. Yes, this is a huge conflict in the movie.

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"Just remember this: all agents defect and all resisters sell out. That's the sad truth, Bill... and a writer? A writer
lives the sad truth like anyone else. The only difference is he files a report on it." ~Naked Lunch


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 Post subject: Re: The DSP Movie Logs
PostPosted: Sat Dec 17, 2011 1:51 am 
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I watched the Soviet horror film Viy earlier tonight. In retrospect, I don't know what I was really expecting from this film, but it both surprised and pleased me. The story is very basic in a charming, sort of folksy way and if you know anything about the genre at all you can immediately sort out where the film is going from the very beginning, but there were a lot of impressive surprises along the way in terms of camera movement, visual composition and special effects - the film utilizes every trick from superimposing to still-frame animation to simple costume and makeup tricks - to make the ride both legitimately tense and extremely fun to watch. The ending goes all out in the best way, leaving nothing to be desired. It's extremely minimalist, being both modest in production and relatively short, clocking in at only 70 minutes.

The other really nice thing about the film is that it showcased so much of the culture it originated from. The story utilizes a lot of Russian culture, from the environments to the music to the actual story which borrows much from the local folklore. The authenticity of these flavor the film and widen the interest outside of simply the horror genre to both arthouse and world cinema as well.

The main character was kind of an idiot in the way that's kind of expected and Viy himself felt a little bit outdated, being as he was a cheap rubber suit monster, but those things hardly worried me while watching the film. I found the experience overall very satisfying.

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I also watched Tromeo and Juliet again, which I admittedly haven't seen in several years but which has long held a close place in my heart (let's put it this way: Tromeo and Juliet is a wonderful gateway drug into underground movie-making), and as I'm feeling even more appreciative of James Gunn than usual these last couple of months I thought it was time to give it another go.

Obviously, I'm a huge supporter of Troma; I've lost track of them more recently, but through the late 90's they were an important company to me. Any counter-culturist worth their salt can tell you that being into Troma films had far less to do with the quality of the features they put out as it did with the attitude and perseverance driving them, but it's also really easy to look back and say that, yes, while Troma made a lot of fun films and distributed a few brilliant ones, they also made way more shit than anything.

Tromeo and Juliet is the best Troma picture for a lot of reasons, not the least of which being the noticeably higher than usual quality of the acting; the Shakespearean dialogue is handled surprisingly well, better in fact than in the recent Baz Luhrmann production of the same play. The dialogue is sharper, the situations built bleed creativity and the soundtrack is surprisingly excellent. The sense of humor it possesses also gets away from the usual slapsticky Troma gags (although there are still a few of these - thanks Lloyd Kaufman) to cleverly go for a much more absurdist, more surreal type of humor. The cheap visuals are taken advantage of the same way, the obvious low quality of the costumes and sets used to add texture to the film. That these things are all directly related to the areas of production that Gunn was responsible for doesn't surprise me in the least, nor that there's the same jump in tone and quality in all of Gunn's Troma-related work.

At the same time, I couldn't picture this film without Troma. Not just because of the portmanteau in the title, but because Tromeo and Juliet more than any other film under their label might be the one that fully encapsulates the Troma punk philosophy of film making - they may not have the money, the resources or the respectability of the higher class studios, but they'll always have their own determination to create and the gall to stand on the fringes. That's a feeling that can't be bought.

Oh, and this film also heavily features my favorite Ass Ponys song.



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"Just remember this: all agents defect and all resisters sell out. That's the sad truth, Bill... and a writer? A writer
lives the sad truth like anyone else. The only difference is he files a report on it." ~Naked Lunch


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 Post subject: Re: The DSP Movie Logs
PostPosted: Mon Dec 19, 2011 11:01 pm 
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The War Zone (1999)
This is the movie Tim Roth directed. You can tell because it has everything in it that British artists love the most:

-Gritty acting
-Bleak, realistic locations
-Class turmoil
-Randomly-placed nude scenes of unattractive people
-Domestic abuse
-Incest
-Ray Winstone domestically abusing and/or incesting

If you like movies with that sort of stuff in it, The War Zone is a good example of how to do the kitchen sink drama well. I would say it ranges somewhere just below the Gary Oldman-directed Nil By Mouth (the last word on these bleak, modern domestic British films) and above the Paddy Considine-directed Tyrannosaur (which I neglected to mention, but I saw earlier this year and was sadly disappointed by).

Obviously it was really depressing, so enjoy having your soul sucked out!

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"Just remember this: all agents defect and all resisters sell out. That's the sad truth, Bill... and a writer? A writer
lives the sad truth like anyone else. The only difference is he files a report on it." ~Naked Lunch


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 Post subject: Re: The DSP Movie Logs
PostPosted: Sat Dec 24, 2011 4:56 pm 
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Choke (2008)
Well, that was a massive clusterfuck. Now I feel less bad about ditching the guy I was supposed to see this in theater with. With terrible film comes closure.

Image Sorry, John.

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Black Death (2010)
After not being the biggest fan of his first two films, Severance and Creep, I find myself a little surprised in my more recent support of Christopher Smith. His last film, Triangle, was one of the more memorable horror films in recent memory and, while his craftsmanship is a bit too middling to produce a masterpiece (although I wouldn't put this idea completely out of question in the future - there's a noted improvement in the execution of each new film turned out over the last), he's at least successful in striving for unique premises to fill out his films and it's refreshing to find a young horror director whose notion of what constitutes "horror" reaches beyond the literal man behind the door with knife in hand. The scares are developed from the story, with the protagonists finding themselves trapped into unwinnable situations through their own actions or through the challenge of their morals, where placed under pressure they're forced to decide what kind of people they are, and in that whether or not they are both deserving and willing to do what's necessary to survive.

Black Death is more of that sort of thing, and doubles as a well-done period piece. It also hits one of my major sweet spots, being an excellent entry into the religious horror subgenre, one of those areas of film that I'm always happy to sink my teeth into. Except of course I won't sink my teeth into this one because it's full of bubonic plague.

References to both The Seventh Seal and Aguirre the Wrath of God were noted.

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Europa (1991)
Lars Von Trier is underrated. I'm just going to leave that here.

Yes, of course I know about his devoted cult niche in the arthouse community, and I know that the sort of films he puts out aren't exactly for public consumption to start with, but even in his more devoted fans the conversation usually centers less around his films and more around debates over misogyny, or accusations of nationalism or just around whatever crazy shit the director has been perpetrating lately. I'm not questioning that Lars Von Trier's craziness isn't entertaining, because IT TOTALLY IS, but I'm also saying that maybe everybody should sit through his films again because the guy is an amazing artist and I think that's a facet that often gets overlooked. Hell, I don't think it's outrageous to suggest that he's one of the best filmmakers currently alive; I have yet to see a piece turned out by him yet that isn't alternatively fascinating or mind-blowing.

I guess what I'm trying to say is that Europa is a masterpiece of crazy that gave my brain warm, blossoming orgasms of pleasure. You should watch it.



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"Just remember this: all agents defect and all resisters sell out. That's the sad truth, Bill... and a writer? A writer
lives the sad truth like anyone else. The only difference is he files a report on it." ~Naked Lunch


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 Post subject: Re: The DSP Movie Logs
PostPosted: Thu Dec 29, 2011 12:32 pm 
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A Dangerous Method (2011)

Disappointing. I think the film is near, if not at, the bottom of Cronenberg's list of accomplishments; oddly enough, that doesn't make it all-out bad as casual cinema, since Cronenberg is too thoughtful and meticulous as a filmmaker to make anything catastrophically awful, but this isn't a fleeting theater drama we're talking about here, this is a Cronenberg film. A Cronenberg film based on a subject that one would expect to be absolutely fascinating in his hands. From that perspective, this movie kind of stinks.

I've been hearing that this film was closest in relation to M. Butterfly, which I don't agree with to the extent that I think Butterfly is one of the more underrated 90's dramas with a lot to offer, but I definitely see the comparisons with the period staginess. The main problem with this film is that, unlike Butterfly, it's lacking any real identity. It's a watchable period piece, but it doesn't feel at all like a Cronenberg film. There's nothing particularly inspired about the ideas in it or the story execution. In fact, if I hadn't been told that Cronenberg directed this, I wouldn't have been able to pick it out from any other generic drama released during fall awards season, nor does the film ever feel like it hits any strides or peaks, nor does the character drama ever really become fulfilling in any way. It just kinda... happens. It's really that bland of a film.

Oh, and Keira Knightley is terrible.

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 Post subject: Re: The DSP Movie Logs
PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2011 2:41 am 
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Well that's disappointing. I really wanted to see that one, and since it's actually showing at my local theater, the idea of seeing a David Cronenberg film in a theater was too cool to pass up. Is it still worth seeing, or should I just pass?

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 Post subject: Re: The DSP Movie Logs
PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2011 9:31 am 
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It's pretty dry. If you're actually interested in Freud and Jung at all, I can see it being worth watching, but even then I would suggest just waiting to rent it. I will admit that I found the dynamic between the two interesting though, and I liked Vincent Cassel's character a lot. I guess there's an interesting point raised in how the constant analysis of sex distances one from the actual enjoyment of the act as well, but mostly I was just surprised in how uninvolved the whole thing was.

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lives the sad truth like anyone else. The only difference is he files a report on it." ~Naked Lunch


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 Post subject: Re: The DSP Movie Logs
PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2011 9:37 am 
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I guess what I'm saying is, how do you get Michael Fassbender and Viggo Mortenson into a David Cronenberg drama together and not have a single naked knife fight? SHOW US YOUR PENIS, VIGGO.

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 Post subject: Re: The DSP Movie Logs
PostPosted: Fri Dec 30, 2011 11:10 pm 
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Tintin's quite exciting.

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 Post subject: Re: The DSP Movie Logs
PostPosted: Mon Jan 02, 2012 6:00 pm 
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Hugo is disappointing.

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"Just remember this: all agents defect and all resisters sell out. That's the sad truth, Bill... and a writer? A writer
lives the sad truth like anyone else. The only difference is he files a report on it." ~Naked Lunch


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